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And the future for News International??

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And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Fri 8 Jul - 17:01

Renault reviews News Int ad plans
By Staff, brandrepublic.com, 08 July 2011, 02:50PM

(Updated 16.15) Renault is reviewing its advertising plans pending the outcome of investigations into The News of the World and says it has no immediate plans to advertise in any News International titles.

Renault: 'va va voom' TV campaign

In a statement today, Renault said: "As a result of the seriousness of the continued allegations of phone hacking by News of the World, Renault is reviewing its media advertising plans, pending the formal investigations. We currently have no advertising planned in any News International press titles in the immediate future."

Renault's statement follows News International taking unprecedented action yesterday, closing the 168-year-old Sunday paper, in an attempt to repair its damaged reputation.

Renault spent £343,829 with the News of the World in the 12 months to the end of April 2011, according to Nielsen.

During the course of yesterday, a trickle turned into a flood of advertisers pulling out of the News of the World under pressure from consumers following allegations it had hacked into the mobile phone of Milly Dowler, a story broken by the Guardian on Monday.

One of those advertisers, Shop Direct, put an advertising boycott in place yesterday of all News International newspapers, pending the outcome of the investigation.

Clarification: An earlier version of this article stated that Renault was boycotting News International titles but Renault wanted to make clear it is reviewing the situation and had no immediate plans to advertise.

http://www.brandrepublic.com/news/1079229/renault-extends-ad-boycott-news-international-titles/

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Fri 8 Jul - 17:52

@TimesCrime
This is significant: NewsInt's new Management and Standards Ctee will report to Joel Klein in New York not to Rebekah Brooks in London #notw

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Fri 8 Jul - 19:57

How Cameron cosied up to Murdoch & Son
The Sun's decision to turn against Labour was the reward for years of shrewd politicking and social networking by the Tory leader and his team. Andy McSmith reports

Thursday, 1 October 2009

It was about 10 minutes to 10 on Tuesday night that mobile phones across Brighton started bleeping. They belonged to the members of the Cabinet and caused many to abandon their dinners and hunch over their Blackberrys, urgently discussing what to do next.

Britain's brashest and biggest-selling tabloid newspaper, which likes to sometimes make news rather than merely report it, was at it again. After 12 years of supporting the Labour Party, The Sun was filling its front page the next morning with the headline "Labour's lost it".

As the news spread like bushfire around the sealed-off part of Brighton where Labour is holding its annual conference, the doors opened on a suite in the Grand Hotel where News International, which owns The Sun, was holding a party.


Gordon Brown, who was expected to attend, immediately cancelled his appearance, as did Peter Mandelson, now his First Secretary, but who in a previous life played a central role in the negotiations between Tony Blair and the Murdoch empire in the 1990s which led to The Sun's backing of Labour in 1997. He knows News International's chief executive, Rebekah Brooks, well, and vented his fury in a telephone conversation with her.

Yesterday, Mandelson's people claimed he told her that she and her colleagues were "chumps". Her version of the same conversation had Mandelson using a noun that sounds similar, but is great deal more vulgar.

But while it was a shock to the Labour faithful, the news that David Cameron now has a political asset that has eluded Conservative leaders for 12 years did not come from nowhere. It was the product of months of networking, negotiating, wine drinking, canape quaffing, villa visiting and yacht boarding as the Conservative Party and Britain's biggest media company learned to love and understand each other once again.

Yesterday, one of the happiest men in the country was Andy Coulson, David Cameron's highly paid and much criticised communications director, for whom the front page of yesterday's Sun was the culmination of months of delicate diplomacy.

Four years ago, when David Cameron did not have an experienced tabloid operator like Coulson to advise him, it nearly went horribly wrong. When the raw and newly elected Tory leader first met News International's patriarch Rupert Murdoch, he was intent on projecting himself as a socially tolerant leader with modern ideas who would shake up an outdated Tory Party. In his anxiety to be modern, Cameron described with great enthusiasm how he had enjoyed the new US blockbuster film Brokeback Mountain. Far from being impressed, the ageing Murdoch was appalled that a would-be prime minister should be watching a film containing graphic scenes of gay sex.

In those days, Murdoch had more time for John Whittingdale, the Tory chairman of the Commons committee on culture and media, who had worked for Margaret Thatcher in Downing Street, than for anyone in Cameron's shadow cabinet. He also thought that the Shadow Chancellor, George Osborne, was more of a Thatcherite than Cameron.

Cameron's master stroke, in June 2007, was to hire Coulson five months after he had lost his job as editor of the Murdoch-owned News of the World when it emerged that the paper had been bugging royal telephones. It was a controversial appointment that opened Cameron to political attack and is costing the Tory party a hefty salary – reputedly £200,000 a year. But it produced dividends, because it meant that the Tory leader had at his side someone he trusted absolutely, who was also trusted inside the social world of the Murdoch clan.

Coulson is a dear friend of Rebekah Brooks, formerly Rebekah Wade, who edited The Sun from 2003 until she stepped up into her post earlier this year. When Wade was arrested in 2005 for allegedly assaulting her then husband, the actor Ross Kemp, it was to Coulson she first turned for help. It is said that each would die for the other.

This link gave Cameron a secure line into the social circle that includes James Murdoch, his sister Elisabeth, her husband the publicist Matthew Freud, Wade's second husband, the old Etonian former racehorse trainer, Charlie Brooks, and Nat Rothschild, of the banking family.

Rothschild, son of Jacob, the fourth Baron Rothschild, is an exact contemporary of David Cameron's most important political ally, George Osborne. As young boys, they were in the same year at a private preparatory school. They met again at Oxford University, where they were members of the elite Bullingdon Club.

In summer 2008, David Cameron and his wife were flown in Matthew Freud's private plane to meet Rupert Murdoch in his yacht, Rosehearty, off a Greek island. Afterwards, Cameron was flown to Turkey for a family holiday, and Murdoch went on to Corfu for his daughter's 40th birthday.

Osborne was already in Corfu, on a family holiday that acquired notoriety because Peter Mandelson was also in the area, and what was said in private aboard a yacht owned by the Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska blew up into a political row after they returned to the UK.

The Osborne family was holidaying in a villa owned by Nat Rothschild, in an area of northern Corfu which is so popular with the London set that it is known as "Kensington on Sea". David Cameron and his family had previously holidayed there in 2006.

One guest who has also stayed at the villa said: "It's an old olive press and olive mill that Jacob Rothschild bought about 25 years ago and which Nat now has. It has been extensively added to over the year, in a very simple way, so that it sleeps about 20. It's stunningly beautiful and understated."

He added: "It all seems incredibly cosy. James Murdoch, Rebekah Wade, Charlie Brooks, Matthew Freud, Elisabeth Murdoch, Cameron and Osborne are all very much at ease with each other. There is a mix of the social and the political. It all seems incredibly close."

No one doubts that it was the Murdochs, father and son, who were behind yesterday's announcement in The Sun, rather than the paper's new editor, Dominic Mohan.

"Everybody was involved to a greater or lesser extent," one senior member of the editorial staff said. "Were Rupert and James involved? The answer to that is that they are always involved in something as important as this. Rupert created The Sun. He's not going to just leave it to someone else. It's his baby."

But it was not all socialising – there was some politics. Executives at News International have been particularly exercised by the threat to newspapers posed by the BBC's website. Speaking at the Edinburgh festival in August, James Murdoch, the son of News International's founder, described the BBC's reach as "chilling". He also complained about the media regulator, Ofcom. Keen to oblige, David Cameron has promised to abolish Ofcom and scale back the BBC.

The probability now is that Murdoch's other daily newspaper, The Times, will follow its tabloid stablemate. Although Tories complain about the closeness between New Labour and some Times political writers, the newspaper has its strong links with the Tories too. There is thought to be a job in a Cameron government and a peerage awaiting the Times chief leader writer, Danny Finkelstein, if he chooses to take it. Finkelstein was Osborne's intellectual mentor when the two worked for the former Tory leader William Hague.

The Times editor, James Harding, fits perfectly within the Cameron social set. He and George Osborne were pupils at the same public schools, St Pauls, as teenagers. He and Cameron played tennis together before Cameron became an MP and in 2006 they were reported to be staying together at the Rothschild villa in Corfu. Harding's fiancée, Kate, is the daughter of the financier, Sir Mark Weinberg, Jacob Rothschild's business partner.

But all this back history did not diminish the shock felt at the Labour party conference in Brighton when news of The Sun's front page hit them. It was a shock, above all for Gordon Brown, who has also tried hard to cultivate the Murdoch clan. In the final days of Tony Blair's premiership in 2007, during one of the farewell parties at 10 Downing Street, guests looked across to the lawn behind No 11 and saw Gordon Brown in conversation with Rupert Murdoch. When Rebekah Wade and Charlie Brooks celebrated their wedding in June, on the Brooks family estate near Chipping Norton, Gordon Brown was there, as well as David Cameron.

But the difference is that Cameron moves smoothly through these occasions, giving the appearance of someone who is having a good time, but Brown is too obviously there out of a sense of duty.

Brown still believed that his relations with the Murdoch empire were intact on Tuesday afternoon as he was delivering his speech to the Labour Party conference, his biggest speech of the year. At 6pm, he put in a routine call to Dominic Mohan, who took over the editorship of The Sun last month.

There have been some famous conversations between Sun editors and prime ministers, including the one in which Kelvin MacKenzie told a beleaguered John Major: "John, let me put it this way. I've got a large bucket of shit lying on my desk and tomorrow morning I'm going to pour it all over your head."

But this conversation produced no fireworks. Mohan did not even tell Brown what the next day's Sun was going to do to him.

In the cold light of morning, Labour had to assess yesterday how much it mattered that their 12-year rapprochement with The Sun was over. The last time that Labour lost a general election, in 1992, The Sun's continuing support for the Conservatives was reckoned to be decisive, both by the defeated Labour leader Neil Kinnock and by the paper itself, which boasted in a famous headline: "It was The Sun wot won it."

But that was in the days before the internet, when 24-hour news was in its infancy and The Sun had a formidable reputation as an opinion former. Although its executives still argue that The Sun's eight to 10 million readers are more likely to switch party allegiancethan readers of other newspapers, they are also rather less likely to vote at all. It is estimated that barely half turned out at the last general election.

And if opinion polls are accurate, Labour under Gordon Brown had already lost the allegiance of a large proportion of those Sun readers who will vote months before yesterday's bombshell. Perhaps a suitable headline for today would be "It was The Sun wot followed the general drift of public opinion and joined the winning side." Not snappy, but accurate.

A question of policy: Cameron and the Murdochs

The media tycoons have much to gain from a Tory administration:

Abolish Ofcom

James Murdoch has complained that the media regulator is unaccountable, and intervenes far too much, stifling creativity (and profit). David Cameron agrees.

The Conservative leadership has been making the right noises for the Murdochs this summer. On 26 June, Ofcom announced it would force Sky to sell premium television football rights for transmission on platforms such as BT. The next day, Sky vented its anger and said it would appeal – with the hint of further legal proceedings. On 6 July, Mr Cameron arranged an unscheduled press conference to talk about quangos and announced that, if elected, he would abolish Ofcom.

Curb the BBC

Its income is guaranteed through the licence system, while the profitability of Sky television and the Murdoch newspapers depend on the state of the market. Mr Cameron is sympathetic.

Wreck the Lisbon Treaty

Rupert Murdoch has never liked the EU, and welcomes anything which holds up further integration. But if, as expected, the Irish vote to ratify the treaty, Mr Cameron may have to disappoint on this one.

Back the troops in Afghanistan

The Sun accuses Labour of not doing so, but it is not obvious what the Tories would do differently. They say they might restore three disbanded infantry battalions, but have not said how to pay for it.

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Fri 8 Jul - 21:39


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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  docmac on Fri 8 Jul - 22:28

Silly question:

Is it really called News International over there? I've always thought it was Newscorp.

Not that it matters much any more. I mean Hugh Hef Murdoch will not be around much longer anyway. I'll bet Wendi is having it on elsewhere already. Yes, Rupe, I said it. Catch me if you can.

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Fri 8 Jul - 22:37

docmac wrote:Silly question:

Is it really called News International over there? I've always thought it was Newscorp.

Not that it matters much any more. I mean Hugh Hef Murdoch will not be around much longer anyway. I'll bet Wendi is having it on elsewhere already. Yes, Rupe, I said it. Catch me if you can.

This may help:


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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  docmac on Fri 8 Jul - 22:59

Thanks, Carmen!

So Newscorp owns NI - now I get it.

Max Clifford? How did I miss that over the last 4 years?

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Badboy on Fri 8 Jul - 23:23

RICHARD BRANSON IS ALSO SUPPOSED TO HAVE BEEN A VICTIM OF PHONE HACKING.

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  blossom45 on Sat 9 Jul - 10:30

carmen,
thank you so much for being on top of this topic,
your diligence makes it so much easier for me to follow...
i take my hat off to all you clever posters for helping divvies like me!

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as above

Post  halfamo on Sat 9 Jul - 16:13

Thanks Carmen what a tangled web much more of this to come to the surface i think .

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Sun 10 Jul - 11:40


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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Mon 11 Jul - 8:53

Murdoch faces new obstacle to Sky takeover

Phone-hacking scandal


Jeremy Hunt's reasons for asking for new advice from the media regulator, Ofcom, and from the competition watchdog, the Office of Fair Trading - in letters he plans to send them later today - are pretty embarrassing for Rupert Murdoch, chairman of News Corporation.

The culture secretary wants to know whether the disclosure that News Corp's News of the World business was out of control for many years is reason to doubt that undertakings given by News Corp to protect the independence and financial strength of Sky News are as credible and sustainable as he would like.

And Mr Hunt wants guidance on the implications for plurality or choice in the media industry of the possibility that News Corp might eventually be deemed by Ofcom as not fit and proper to own all of BSkyB.

For Mr Hunt to suggest that News Corp might not be a fit-and-proper owner of anything is a pretty big shift from the prevailing - and some would say fawning - attitudes towards Mr Murdoch we've witnessed from British governments in recent years.

British Sky Broadcasting Group
LAST UPDATED AT 11 JUL 2011, 08:33
*CHART SHOWS LOCAL TIME



price change %
701.00 p -
-49.00
-
-6.53
Finally, Mr Hunt makes the less contentious point that the closure of the News of the World changes plurality in the media universe: that's a definitional point, in that there is, as of today, one less news voice.

However it is unclear whether the closure of the News of the World represents a reduction in News Corp's market share, and therefore an enhancement of its clam that plurality isn't damaged by its plan to own all of BSkyB - or whether the demise of the News of the World suggests that important media voices are not safe under News Corp's stewardship.

Either way, the importance of Mr Hunt's letter is in the generality: it is all a pretty clear hint that Mr Hunt might after all decide to refer the takeover to the Competition Commission for lengthy examination.

As the latest of a whole series of roadblocks recently erected in the way of that takeover - it is highly likely that BSkyB's shares will fall again this morning.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-14026369

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Panda on Mon 11 Jul - 9:10

Thanks Carmen for the Dennis Potter interview......he dies in 1994, 17 years ago and nothing has changed., if fact it it worse!!

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Mon 11 Jul - 10:15

Panda wrote:Thanks Carmen for the Dennis Potter interview......he dies in 1994, 17 years ago and nothing has changed., if fact it it worse!!

Yes, that interview should be a compulsory part of schooling!

Mary Ann Sieghart: Power has shifted back to the people
Politicians will be more worried about incurring the wrath of voters than the wrath of a proprietor of a discredited company


Monday, 11 July 2011

To crush a bully, the calculus of fear must be transformed. Each potential victim – terrified of being picked on – has to trust that everyone else will put aside their fear and join him in defying the aggressor. Eventually, if all the victims stand together and refuse to be cowed, the bully has to slink away.

Until now, few MPs have dared individually to stand up to News International for fear that they would be done over by the News of the World. This was no idle threat; it happened, for instance, to the Labour MP Chris Bryant. Few journalists have dared to do so for the same reason – with the added worry that they would never in future be able to work for any of the four papers that make up 37 per cent of Britain's newspaper circulation.

So defeating the bully could work only if both party leaders were determined not to flinch. I am not suggesting that Ed Miliband and David Cameron colluded with each other last week. But Miliband calculated, rightly, that public opinion was so strongly behind a challenge that Cameron would not dare to defend Murdoch and News International if the Labour leader attacked them.

MPs sensed the change in the mood too. At the emergency debate on phone hacking on Wednesday, dozens of people spoke who would have remained silent before.

And what had happened to public opinion? Well, at last readers had started to question what went into the stories that they so enjoyed reading. Just as shoppers eventually turned against battery-farmed chicken and clothes made by child labour, so they finally began to take an interest in the methods used to fuel their diet of tittle-tattle. It was about time, as these practices have been widespread for decades and it's been hard to rouse any public anger about them before now. Most readers simply preferred not to know, just as some would rather not know what's in their meat pie.

I've commented before on the callousness readers reserve for people in the public eye, who are deemed to forfeit any human right to privacy as soon as they become successful in their chosen field. It was only when the News of the World, a newspaper that claimed to represent the ordinary person, had – in the cruellest possible way – turned its dark arts on ordinary people that the public fury was ignited. And then it was able to spread, thanks to Twitter and Facebook. Huge companies realised they would suffer reputational damage or boycotts if they advertised in the paper. Members of the public, who used to shrug their shoulders and ask, "Well, what can I do about it?", found they suddenly had power to effect change. And boy did it work.

That I am celebrating the success of people power may sound hypocritical from a journalist who spent 19 years at The Times, at the more salubrious end of the Murdoch empire. But I was always uneasy about the nastiness of what were then known as the tabloids, and I wrote as much at the time. It was never going to do my career at News International any good, and it reaped the inevitable revenge from the Daily Mail. (Once, when I had assailed the Mail for its intrusiveness, a friend there heard the diarist attack dog ask the Managing Editor, "Have you got that file on Mary Ann Sieghart?")

Miliband too has had several threatening conversations with News International executives since he took his stand. But we shall now treat with the necessary scepticism any attack on the Labour leader from a News International paper. Their power to wound is waning.

Now is the time to exploit that weakness. For it is surely wrong that a business that not only indulges in criminal activity, but lies about it and covers it up, should be allowed to expand its already vast media reach. On Wednesday, Labour will introduce a motion in the Commons that would prevent News Corp from buying the whole of BSkyB until criminal investigations are complete. Miliband's office has been taking legal advice and talking to Lib Dems and Tories who have concerns about the takeover in order to draft a motion that will attract the widest cross-party support.

No one has yet seen the exact wording, but as long it doesn't try to score party-political points, the Lib Dems will support it and so will quite a clutch of independent-minded Conservatives. The Tories haven't yet decided whether to whip their MPs, but they might be wise, if Labour's motion is going to win anyway, to leave it to a free vote. For, as a Cabinet minister told me yesterday, "If they let the deal go through now, it will smell to high heaven, and if they do it in three months' time, it will still smell." The opposition of the House of Commons to an immediate deal, while not binding, would be a useful justification for a delay.

The Lib Dems have always been against the concentration of media power that News International represents. The Tories, though, have never cared much – indeed it was John Biffen, during the Thatcher administration, who waved through the purchase of The Times and The Sunday Times, bypassing the Monopolies Commission. So it was quite a surprise to talk to a Conservative MP yesterday and hear him say, "When media power is in too few hands, it has a chilling effect on democracy, as we've seen. Too few people calling the shots is dangerous. There should be a bigger discussion about monopolies in the media."

One intriguing question is whether that discussion will extend to any attempt by News International to replace the News of the World with a Sun on Sunday.

The company will argue that it only represents a return to the status quo. But the status quo – 37 per cent of national newspaper circulation – was already far too high. In any other sector, it would trigger a Competition Commission inquiry, so why not in newspapers, which are particularly sensitive to monopoly abuse?

Murdoch is used to getting his own way. Not just in Britain, but in Australia and America too, he has leaned on politicians to have regulations changed in his favour. In his native Australia, there was even what came to be known as the "Murdoch Amendment" to the broadcasting laws, which allowed him to own a TV licence even though he didn't live in the country.

Well, the calculus of power – as well as fear– has now changed. Politicians will be more worried about incurring the wrath of voters than the wrath of a proprietor of a discredited newspaper company. Murdoch will no longer be able to snap his fingers and have a Prime Minister stand to attention. And Britain is all the better for it.

m.sieghart@independent.co.uk

Following @MASieghart

Like Mary Ann Sieghart on The Independent on Facebook for updates

http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/mary-ann-sieghart/mary-ann-sieghart-power-has-shifted-back-to-the-people-2311673.html


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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Mon 11 Jul - 14:41

@KeirSimmonsITV
Astonishing claim being made by Vanity Fair jounalist that Murdoch is considering selling all of News International (via @MichaelWolffNYC)
12 minutes ago via HootSuite

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  chrissie on Mon 11 Jul - 15:19

Yahoo! UK editor
Reports suggest that Gordon Brown will make a statement around 4.30 which will cause the hacking story to explode.
13 minutes ago via TweetDeck

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  kitti on Mon 11 Jul - 16:07

The sun and the times involved in hacking....the sun when...guess who was their....yes you got it....brooks....when Gordon browns daughter was found to have a brain disorder it was published In the newspapers a week BEFORE she died about her illness when it was private and KNOWONE knew plus his sons illness had been printed in the papers when KNOWONE knew except Gordon and his wife and the hospital!

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  kitti on Mon 11 Jul - 16:09

News international are finished.

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  kitti on Mon 11 Jul - 16:10

Murdoch WON'T give up his deal for BSKYB.........bastard.


He doesn't care how many people he has hurt.

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  margaret on Mon 11 Jul - 16:17

kitti wrote:Murdoch WON'T give up his deal for BSKYB.........bastard.


He doesn't care how many people he has hurt.

But he won't win it IMO, and if he does well it would be WAR , the world and it's wife are gunning for Murdoch and Brooks as it is.

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Mon 11 Jul - 20:22

Shareholders sue News Corp for failing to take early action on phone hacking scandal
News Corp is being sued by a group of shareholders who allege that a failure of corporate governance is behind the phone-hacking scandal engulfing Rupert Murdoch's media company.


Rupert Murdoch fearful as BSkyB deal in jeopardy after shares take a tumble.
By Richard Blackden, and Josie Ensor4:11PM BST 11 Jul 20112 Comments
The lawsuit, filed by Amalgamated Bank and a group of pension funds, accuses News Corp's board of "failing to exercise proper oversight and take sufficient action since news of the hacking first surfaced at its subsidiary nearly six years ago."
The failure of News Corp's board has led to a "piling on of questionable deals, a waste of corporate resources, a starring role in a blockbuster scandal, and a gigantic public relations disaster," said Jay Eisenhofer of Grant & Eisenhofer, the law firm that filed the suit in Delaware.
The legal complaint is an updated version of action that Amalgamated first bought in March, when they accused Mr Murdoch of "rampant nepotism" for paying 415m pounds for Shine, a UK television production company founded by his daughter Elizabeth. News Corp could not immediately be reached for comment.
News Corp's shares plunged more than 6.6pc on opening, as investors digested developments on both sides of the Atlantic.
Rupert Murdoch's biographer had earlier suggested that News Corp could even be mulling a sale of News International in an attempt to calm calls for it to shelve its proposed bid for BSkyB.

Michael Wolff, Vanity Fair contributing editor, tweeted: "#MURDOCHGATE Get out of Dodge strategy being discussed at News Corp: Sell all of News Int."
British Sky Broadcasting had £877m wiped off its value on Monday morning, as shares crashed back to the level of News Corporation's original proposed bid for the company.
Shares in the company fell 7.3pc on market opening to below £7, as the British government asked media regulator Ofcom to consider whether undertakings provided by News Corp to secure a buy out of BSkyB were still credible in light of a phone hacking scandal.
BSkyB's shares have slumped 17pc so far this month, valuing the company at £12.3bn.
UK Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg also urged News Corp to reconsider its proposed bid for the company on Monday morning.
Speaking to the BBC, Mr Clegg said the public had “reacted with revulsion” to the allegations of phone hacking at the News of the World adding that Mr Murdoch should "do the sensible thing, reconsider and think again for your bid for BSkyB."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/phone-hacking/8630545/Shareholders-sue-News-Corp-for-failing-to-take-early-action-on-phone-hacking-scandal.html

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  whatsupdoc on Mon 11 Jul - 20:59

Just seen this...

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/plan-emerges-to-re-launch-news-of-the-world.html


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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Mon 11 Jul - 21:12

And I've just spotted this - the Americans are onto him

Jul 11, 2011
CREW: Calls for Congressional Investigation into News Corp


Washington, D.C. –Today, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) called on the House and Senate to investigate whether journalists working for Rupert Murdoch’s News International (NI), owned by News Corp., have hacked into the voicemail of Americans.

Despite claims by NI executives that the phone hacking scandal enveloping Murdoch and his media empire was confined to the now-defunct News of the World, new evidence shows other Murdoch papers used the same tactics. Former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown was repeatedly targeted for more than a decade by other Murdoch publications.

Further, a former New York City police officer claims he was offered money by News of the World journalists to retrieve the phone records of 9/11 victims and their families.

“It is becoming increasingly clear this scandal was not perpetrated by a few rogue reporters, but was systematically orchestrated at the highest levels of News Corp.,” said CREW Executive Director Melanie Sloan. “If Mr. Murdoch’s employees can be so brazen as to target the British prime minister, then it is not unreasonable to believe they also might hack into the voicemails of American politicians and citizens.”

NI executives repeatedly have claimed only a few “rogue” reporters at News of the World were involved in the hacking. In 2007, Les Hinton, one of Mr. Murdoch’s closest advisors and now the chief executive officer of Dow Jones, which publishes the Wall Street Journal, testified – it now appears untruthfully – before a parliamentary committee that the hacking was limited to a single reporter. Fox News and the New York Post are also owned by News Corp.

“Given the ever-increasing number of Murdoch publications involved, combined with the allegation that News Corp. journalists sought access to the voicemails of 9/11 victims and their families, America cannot leave this investigation entirely to the British. Congress should immediately initiate its own inquiry,” said Ms. Sloan. “Politicians in Washington may not be able to agree on much these days, but at the very least they should be able to agree that efforts to hack the phones of those killed in the worst terrorist attack in American history merits thorough public hearings.”

http://www.citizensforethics.org/legal-filings/entry/crew-calls-for-congressional-investigation-into-news-corp

Letter here:

http://crew.3cdn.net/8402e3046358f774c2_bbm6bwnkw.pdf

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Panda on Mon 11 Jul - 21:28

Yes, on Bloomberg News I posted ealier on the Armageddon thread, apart from Murdoch changing the offer, the news in America was that 9/11
victims Families had their phones tapped. It is looking increasingly obvious that hacking was endemic through the whole Murdoch Empire and I
think it will have to be broken up. The Americans are more on the Ball than we are and with the price of bskyb falling dramatically I think there will be more Lawsuits, Murdoch could be declared unfit to show good governance of his empire although I am sure he will have excellent legal Firms to act
for him.

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Re: And the future for News International??

Post  Guest on Mon 11 Jul - 21:32


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