Missing Madeleine
Come join us...there's more inside you cannot see as a guest!

New EC Thread

Page 5 of 40 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 22 ... 40  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:12 am

'
Its deputy labour minister has resigned in protest after Greece
agreed to the deal, accusing debt inspectors of using "shameless and
blackmailing tactics".

I would agree with this, how can any Politicial Party in the forseeable future in Greece commit to adhering to the ruiles????

It looks as though the Troika are making it impossible for Greece to stay in the Euro , partly because they know some Euro Countries are against any
more bailouts to Greece . Greece would be better off leaving the Euro although initially it will be very difficult , it won't be as bad as having to pay back
all this debt whilst living in austere conditions for decades.

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  margaret on Fri Feb 10, 2012 1:42 pm

When Greece had their other bailout l thought that was all they could have??

I don't expect things to get any better for the foreseeable future IMO it's time to abandon the EU, the only people who want it still are those on the gravy train, i.e. euro fat cats like Neil Kinnock and family.

margaret
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 4406
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2009-08-25

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:23 pm

margaret wrote:When Greece had their other bailout l thought that was all they could have??

I don't expect things to get any better for the foreseeable future IMO it's time to abandon the EU, the only people who want it still are those on the gravy train, i.e. euro fat cats like Neil Kinnock and family.

Yes margaret, even if they receive the latest bail-out a few months down the line they will default.

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:41 pm

The Greek Deputy foreign Minister has submitted his resignation,

The Greek Finance Minister says the vote will be on whether we stay in the EU or not.

Junkler says Greece has been missing it's target of 136% GDP set at the first bail-out.

The EU wants the austerity measures passed in Lawe so that Future Governments adhere to the promise.

the ECB can pay a pivotal role in solving the deficit but the remit of the ECB is to stabilise the EURO and to make the ECB a central bank would require
a change in the Treaty.

Euro finance Ministers to meet next week and the payment of E19 million is due to be paid on 20th March

The Greeks are again out on the street opposite the Greek Parliament Building protesting at the austerity measures and more strikes are planned.

One of the Greek Daily Papers has a front page showing Angela Merkel dressed in a Nazi Uniform, complete with Swastika

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Fri Feb 10, 2012 6:16 pm



Europe is just as guilty
as Greece



La Stampa


The new Eurogroup meeting
on February 9 is not enough to banish the spectre of a Greek bankruptcy. While
Athens may largely be responsible for the crisis, the EU and its partners are
not blameless themselves. La Stampa argues that their confused messages and the
absence of any strategy have transformed a resolvable problem into an explosive
chaos

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Fri Feb 10, 2012 6:24 pm

Feb 10, 1:02 PM EST


Greek PM vows to rescue bailout deal















AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris



































Advertisement



















































Buy AP Photo Reprints


































Photo Gallery














Violent protests in Greece













Interactives



























































































































Lexicon of the financial crisis
Americans' addiction to debt













ATHENS, Greece (AP) -- Greece's prime minister has promised to
"do everything necessary" to rescue a euro130 billion ($170 billion)
bailout deal, after six members of his cabinet walked out over harsh new
austerity measures, triggering a political crisis in the near-bankrupt
country.
In a televised address Friday, Prime
Minister Lucas Papademos said senior members of his government would be
expelled if they oppose the austerity program, due to be voted in
parliament late Sunday.
Earlier Friday, a
small right-wing party in Papademos' coalition said it would not back
the new measures and four of its officials in the cabinet resigned.
THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.
ATHENS,
Greece (AP) - Greece's future in the euro grew increasingly precarious
Friday as violence erupted on the streets of Athens during a general
strike and five politicians resigned from the government after European
leaders demanded deeper spending cuts.
Hours
after Greece claimed it had reached an agreement among its squabbling
party leaders on new cutbacks, European officials dashed any hopes that
the country was close to getting its bailout. Finance ministers said
more austerity needs to be agreed and set a deadline for the middle of
next week.
If Greece's government fails to
meet Europe's demands, the debt-ridden country faces a chaotic debt
default next month that would send shockwaves around the world economy
and could doom a generation of Greeks to even deeper hardship.
If
it does deliver those demands, Europe has committed to give it a
euro130 billion ($172 billion) lifeline that would at least postpone
Greece's day of reckoning.
"No disbursement
without implementation," Jean-Claude Juncker, the Luxembourg premier who
also chairs the eurozone's finance ministers' meetings, said Thursday
after they declined to fully back the deal Greek leaders had agreed.
The
eurozone finance ministers want Greece to find another euro325 million
($432 million) in savings and say Parliament must to vote the austerity
through. Worried that Greek political leaders could later renege on the
austerity promises, they also requested that the party heads commit to
the measures even after general elections in April.
The fallout from the eurozone's demands was immediate in Athens.
Thousands
of people marched through the streets to protest the cuts, which
include a 22 percent drop in the minimum wage at time when the
unemployment rate is over 20 percent and the economy is in a fifth year
of recession. Clashes broke out, with demonstrators hurling fire bombs
at riot police shooting tear gas.
Resistance
was also growing in Athens' halls of power, with six members of the
48-strong Cabinet leaving the government over the past two days because
they could not agree to the new demands.
The
five were Deputy Foreign Minister Mariliza Xenogiannakopoulou, a
majority Socialist lawmaker, the transport minister and the deputy
ministers of defense, merchant marine and agriculture - all members of
the rightist LAOS party, a junior coalition member. On Thursday, Deputy
Labor Minister Yiannis Koutsoukos, a Socialist, also quit.
"They
are trying to impose measures that will make the recession worse and
drive the country to despair," Xenogiannakopoulou said in a letter,
adding that she would vote against the cutbacks in parliament.
LAOS
leader George Karatzaferis said he was withdrawing support for the
measures agreed a day earlier, describing the country's treatment by its
European partners as "humiliating."
Though
LAOS is a small party, its action underscores the growing discontent,
both among political leaders and households - nearly one in two young
people are out of work.
LAOS has 16 deputies
in the 300-seat parliament in a coalition backed by 252 lawmakers,
posing no direct threat to the measures that are due to be voted late
Sunday and backed by the two major coalition parties, the Socialists and
conservatives.
The Socialists and
conservatives have both called emergency meetings of their parliament
members following a Cabinet meeting scheduled for about 1600 GMT.
The uncertainty hit global markets, as shares on the Athens Stock Exchange plunged 4.6 and the euro sank 0.7 percent to $1.3180.
As
well as trying to secure the bailout, Greece is close to concluding a
related debt-relief agreement with banks that would slash euro100
billion ($132 billion) from the country's national debt.
In
return for the promised debt relief, Prime Minister Papademos and heads
of the three parties backing his government - including Karatzaferis -
have already agreed to demands to fire 15,000 civil servants in 2012,
slash the minimum wage and significant reductions in health, social
security and military spending.
Karatzaferis
insisted it was not his intention to withdraw from the government, and
urged other countries in the European Union to challenge what he
described as Germany's domination of the union.
"Of
course we do not want to be outside the EU, but we can get by without
being under the German jackboot," he told a news conference. "Like all
Greeks, I am very irritated ... by this humiliation."
In
central Athens, clashes erupted outside Parliament between dozens of
hooded youths and police in riot gear. Police said eight officers and
two members of the public were injured, while six suspected rioters were
arrested.
The violence broke out as thousands
took to the streets of the capital after unions launched a two-day
general strike against the planned austerity measures.
Police
said some 7,000 people took part in the demonstration. Another 10,000
Communist supporters held a separate, peaceful march.
Scores
of youths, in hoods and gas masks, used sledge hammers to smash up
marble paving stones in Athens' main Syntagma Square before hurling the
rubble at riot police.
The country's two
biggest labor unions stopped railway, ferry and public transport
schedules, and hospitals worked on skeleton staff while most public
services were disrupted. Unions were planning protests in Athens and
other cities around midday.
The harsh measures
follow two years of severe income losses, repeated tax hikes and
retirement age increases that failed to materially improve the country's
finances.
Greek politicians have taken a lot
of criticism for the situation, and polls show the majority Socialists,
elected in a 2009 landslide are now languishing at around 8 percent.
"We are experiencing tragic moments," Deputy Prime Minister Theodoros Pangalos told Parliament Friday.
EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso on Friday offered hope a deal could still be struck.
"I
am confident that a solution will be reached next week as this is
critically important for Greece and the Greek citizens first and
foremost but also for the whole euro area," he said during a visit to
India.
---
Gabriele Steinhauser and Slobodan Lekic in Brussels and Angela Charlton in Paris contributed.
© 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.



































Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:16 am

Debt crisis


Time – Fate of world on Monti’s shoulders



10 February 2012


Presseurop

Time
















Time, 10 February 2012








"Can this man save Europe?", wonders Time magazine on its cover.
In heading to Washington and New York in recent days as part of his
efforts to straighten out his own country, "the most important man of
Europe", as the US weekly calls the Italian leader, was seeking nothing
less than to avoid the collapse of the eurozone – and even of the global
economy -


Monti’s mission matters to everybody, from Wall Street financiers to
Chinese factory workers. That’s because Italy’s problems have became the
world's problems, and Monti must fix Italy to avoid another global
financial crisis. [...] Though the debt crisis in Europe has been raging
for over two years, Italy [whose debt exceeds 120% of its GDP] looms as
the biggest threat to the embattled shared currency’s survival, because
Italy paradoxically is both too big to fail and too big to save. [...]
Yet if Italy tumbles into insolvency, it could set off a chain of events
that unravels the monetary union and puts Europe’s even grander
half-century long democratic integration experiment in peril.

Monti's success is just as crucial for the global economy. The
consequences of a default of Italy – and, worse, the collapse of the
euro – are almost unimaginable. Italy could spark a financial crisis
even more destructive than the one tipped off by the 2008 Lehman
Brothers bankruptcy. Shock waves would ripple through global financial
markets to every corner of the world, sinking banks and economies along
the way. A recession in Europe, home to hundreds of millions of rich
consumers, could derail the U.S. recovery and dampen emerging markets.
The fates of Mario Monti, Europe and the worldwide recovery have become
inexorably entwined.

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:28 am

Anniversaries

Dickens forecast the crisis






Charles Dickens was born 200 years ago, on February 7, 1812.
Nearly a century and a half after his death in 1870, "our world,
unfortunately, resembles his in several ways," notes Spanish daily El País. Referring to 'Hard Times', the paper writes –


... today, in the midst of the crisis, with the stock market in the
red, with high taxes and low salaries; with European governments who
try to fill the bottomless pit of the financial system with public
funds; and unemployment which continues to rise, it is possible that
the reader would be surprised to see how the novel, published in 1854,
describes reality.
Unsurprisingly, it is Greece that today seems to best evoke the
London of 150 years ago. "Those children, abandoned in the street by
their families in the hope that someone will feed them, could they not
appear in 'Oliver Twist' alongside street children?" wonders El País.
Contrary to Dickens' forecasts, the injustice of capitalism did not
lead to its collapse. "One need just look again at Greece today," the
paper says, adding –


The television talks about children, who mid-morning, faint from
hunger in class and newspapers report that, while the country is
soliciting aid from the European Union, its rulers are going to
Switzerland with over €200 billion.

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Guest on Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:35 am

I have two Greek friends here who were sending food parcels back home for their parents. Eventually they had to stop because the people in the post office were nicking them. It's quite shocking that this is happening in an EC country in this day and age.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:41 am

Iris wrote:I have two Greek friends here who were sending food parcels back home for their parents. Eventually they had to stop because the people in the post office were nicking them. It's quite shocking that this is happening in an EC country in this day and age.

I think Merkel and Sarkozy should have let Greece default 2 years ago , but that would have caused chaos around the financial World so they had to be bailed out. The cost to Greece is so horrendous it will take 3 generations to repay so my guess is they will default. analysts are saying Investors have
already factored this in and Countries have been reducing their Euro stocks.

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Badboy on Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:46 am

Panda wrote:Anniversaries

Dickens forecast the crisis






Charles Dickens was born 200 years ago, on February 7, 1812.
Nearly a century and a half after his death in 1870, "our world,
unfortunately, resembles his in several ways," notes Spanish daily El País. Referring to 'Hard Times', the paper writes –


... today, in the midst of the crisis, with the stock market in the
red, with high taxes and low salaries; with European governments who
try to fill the bottomless pit of the financial system with public
funds; and unemployment which continues to rise, it is possible that
the reader would be surprised to see how the novel, published in 1854,
describes reality.
Unsurprisingly, it is Greece that today seems to best evoke the
London of 150 years ago. "Those children, abandoned in the street by
their families in the hope that someone will feed them, could they not
appear in 'Oliver Twist' alongside street children?" wonders El País.
Contrary to Dickens' forecasts, the injustice of capitalism did not
lead to its collapse. "One need just look again at Greece today," the
paper says, adding –


The television talks about children, who mid-morning, faint from
hunger in class and newspapers report that, while the country is
soliciting aid from the European Union, its rulers are going to
Switzerland with over €200 billion.

CHILDREN FAINTING FROM HUNGER IN CLASS,SOUNDS A BIT LIKE ETHIOPIA AND SOMALIA FAMINE.

Badboy
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Male
Number of posts : 7728
Age : 50
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2009-08-31

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:51 am

10 February 2012 Last updated at 19:48




Standard and Poor's downgrades Italy banks

Unicredit is among the 34 banks
downgraded by Standard and Poor's
Continue
reading the main story

Global
Economy






The credit ratings agency Standard
and Poor's has downgraded its assessment of almost all of Italy's major
banks.

The review involves 34 of the 37 banks covered by the agency.

Italy's biggest financial institutions, including UniCredit, Intesa Sanpaolo,
Banco Popolare, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro and Mediobanca, are among them.

A credit rating affects the price of borrowing and the move follows S&P's
two-notch downgrade of the Italian government's creditworthiness.

But despite the sovereign downgrade, which typically makes borrowing more
expensive, Italy's Prime Minister Mario Monti's austerity plan has helped to
bring down Italy's 10-year borrowing rate closer to 6% from 7% for much of last
year.

The action came too late to prompt share price reaction as it came after the
market closed.




Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:58 am

Badboy wrote:
Panda wrote:Anniversaries

Dickens forecast the crisis






Charles Dickens was born 200 years ago, on February 7, 1812.
Nearly a century and a half after his death in 1870, "our world,
unfortunately, resembles his in several ways," notes Spanish daily El País. Referring to 'Hard Times', the paper writes –


... today, in the midst of the crisis, with the stock market in the
red, with high taxes and low salaries; with European governments who
try to fill the bottomless pit of the financial system with public
funds; and unemployment which continues to rise, it is possible that
the reader would be surprised to see how the novel, published in 1854,
describes reality.
Unsurprisingly, it is Greece that today seems to best evoke the
London of 150 years ago. "Those children, abandoned in the street by
their families in the hope that someone will feed them, could they not
appear in 'Oliver Twist' alongside street children?" wonders El País.
Contrary to Dickens' forecasts, the injustice of capitalism did not
lead to its collapse. "One need just look again at Greece today," the
paper says, adding –


The television talks about children, who mid-morning, faint from
hunger in class and newspapers report that, while the country is
soliciting aid from the European Union, its rulers are going to
Switzerland with over €200 billion.

CHILDREN FAINTING FROM HUNGER IN CLASS,SOUNDS A BIT LIKE ETHIOPIA AND SOMALIA FAMINE.

Hi Badboy, if Greece accepts the bailout there will be famine for years to come, default will also leave the Country broke , but recovery will be quicker.
This has been badly handled by Merkel and the Troika and if Greece defaults there will be a contagion affecting Italy Spain, France, Belgium and Ireland
and maybe even the collapse of the Euro.

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Badboy on Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:02 pm

NEXT ,THERE MIGHT BE FOOD AID FOR GREECE.
WILL GREECE BECOME A THIRD WORLD COUNTRY?

Badboy
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Male
Number of posts : 7728
Age : 50
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2009-08-31

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:17 pm

Badboy wrote:NEXT ,THERE MIGHT BE FOOD AID FOR GREECE.
WILL GREECE BECOME A THIRD WORLD COUNTRY?

Yes it might. First of all it would have to sell off assets, like Airports, but unlike somalia , it doesn't suffer from drought so can grow enough to feed it's
population, to convert the euro to Drachma will be a horrendous task but whatever hardships Greece faces will be easier than borrowing more and more money. To anticipate that Greece will have 130% GDP in 2020 is an indication of how long it would take Greece to have the 3%GDP.!!!!!!

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 1:39 pm

Athens and Buridan’s ass




10 February 2012










Athens must now contend with a dilemma of a kind illustrated by
the paradox of Buridan’s ass: the donkey cannot decide what to do first,
to eat his oats or drink from a pail of water, and thus dies from
hunger and thirst.

If Buridan’s ass was a man, wrote Spinoza, “he would not act on the
basis of freedom or free will.” And we might add that if Buridan’s ass
were a country, it would be Greece which has to choose between austerity
and state reform, dictated by the IMF-EU-ECB troika, and against the
will of its people and its special interests.

How else can we interpret the ultimatum issued by eurozone finance
ministers on 9 February? The Greek government will have to find a
further 325 million in savings before Wednesday 15 February if it wants
to receive the 130 billion euros approved by European leaders last
October.

As Volkskrant noted this week, a Greek exit from the eurozone
is no longer taboo, given the level of European exasperation with slow
pace of reform in Greece. After two years of crisis, the effectiveness
of the Greek tax system has not improved, many of the promises made to
the troika have not been kept. In short, the donkey of Athens appears
reluctant to begin with the oats of reform.

However, it has no greater enthusiasm for the potion of austerity,
and is unwilling to empty the bucket held out by the troika and its
creditors. This is partly for reasons of political calculation because
the parties that have given their half-hearted support to Prime Minister
Lucas Papadémos are also concerned about the outcome of future
elections, but also and more importantly because the impoverished Greek population, which has had to contend with two years of wage cuts and price increases, cannot support the burden of further austerity.

To save Greece, the Eurogroup ministers have decided to insist on
even more austerity, when they should be pushing for the application of
reforms that have already been demanded, like the reform of the
country’s tax system.

More importantly they should oblige Athens to put an end to aberrations like the Greek Church’s tax exemption and a defence budget that is proportionally higher than in other European states.

If the donkey dies, that is to say if Greece defaults and leaves the
eurozone, he will partly be to blame for his own fate. But only partly
because he will also have been pushed into making choice that is not
only impossible but also misguided.







Author





French journalist Eric Maurice, (b. 1972) is editor in chief of
presseurop.eu. After joining Courrier international in 2000, he was in
charge of the Paris weekly's France pages, before covering North
American affairs, and later becoming chief editor for Western Europe.

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 3:48 pm

Feb 11, 10:32 AM EST


Greece's coalition party leaders back bailout deal



By DEMETRIS NELLAS
Associated Press













AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris











Business Video





























Advertisement


















































Buy AP Photo Reprints


































Photo Gallery














Violent protests in Greece













Interactives






































































































































ATHENS, Greece (AP) -- The leaders of the two parties backing
Greece's coalition government made dramatic appeals to their deputies
Saturday to back legislation that calls for harsh new austerity measures
- essential if Greece is to get a new bailout deal worth euro130
billion ($171.6 billion) and stave off bankruptcy.
Prime Minister Lucas Papademos is expected to give a televised address later Saturday to defend the deal.
Debate
on emergency legislation approving the new bailout and a debt-swapping
deal with private creditors began in committee Saturday afternoon. A
plenary session will debate and vote on it Sunday. Further legislation
detailing the measures demanded by, and agreed with, Greece's public
creditors, the European Union and the International Monetary Fund, will
be up for vote a few days later. The exact time has not yet been set.
Both
leaders - socialist George Papandreou and conservative Antonis Samaras -
as well as Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos, a socialist, used
stark images of a country under bankruptcy to warn their respective
parliamentary groups of the importance of their vote.
"If we do not dare today, we will live a catastrophe," Papandreou said.
"What
do you want, a country where food will be handed out with food stamps
and where we will have no fuel?" Samaras angrily told a dissenting
deputy.
"The battle is now. The war is now. If
we falter, nothing will be left standing...The real dilemma is between
painful measures and crushingly painful ones," Venizelos told socialist
lawmakers.
Deputies are wary of voting for the
measures, which include wage and pension cuts and the prospect of more
to come, along with the firing of several thousand civil servants and
the shutdown of several state agencies, including welfare agencies. The
demands of the EU and the IMF have caused one of the original coalition
parties - the populist right-wing Popular Orthodox Party - to quit the
government and withdraw its four members from the cabinet. Two more
cabinet members - both socialist deputy ministers - have also quit,
citing their disagreements with parts of the austerity package.
Both
Papandreou and Samaras made it clear that dissenters would have no
place in the party. Samaras was more emphatic, threatening to expel
those who did not vote in favor and exclude them from the lists of party
candidates in the next election. "I want to make it absolutely clear
... rebels or 'bravehearts' have no place in (the party's) candidate
lists," he said.
"I call on you to fall in
line and vote for this difficult and painful deal that will help (the
country) stand on its feet. Whoever has a conscience problem, can
resign," Papandreou told his lawmakers.
Despite
their leaders' calls, at least four deputies from each party openly
declared they would vote against, while two socialist deputies - both
former ministers - hinted they might do so. None offered to resign.
Together, the socialists and the conservatives have 236 deputies in the 300-member parliament.
Samaras
also called for an immediate election once the bond swap deal with
Greece's private creditors is over, saying he would not agree to the
extension of the mandate of the coalition government beyond that date.
Elections are normally due in October 2013. The bond swap deal with
Greece's private creditors is expected to help Greece get rid of some
euro100 billion of its debt. The bond swap must be completed before
March 20, the redemption date for euro14.5 billion worth of bonds.
Elections could then be held about three weeks later than that, at the
earliest.
While the two parties met, union
leaders staged a demonstration outside parliament that attracted about
4,000 protesters, according to the police - while 5-6,000 policemen
patrolled the streets of Athens. The protest ended with some scuffles
that left two people injured when police tried to clear the street in
front of parliament. Authorities are bracing for a much larger, and
possibly violent, one on Sunday evening.
Another 4,000 turned out for a peaceful demonstration in Thessaloniki, Greece's second city.
---
Costas Kantouris in Thessaloniki contributed to this report.
© 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.













































Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Angelique on Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:52 pm

Panda and Badboy

Can you wait for me to catch up - what I mean is - I am here just have to start at the beginning.

ETA I knew it was Germany all along!

Angelique
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 3418
Location : Freezing in England
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-08-28

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Angelique on Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:06 pm

Panda

I enjoyed reading this :
Ingo Schulze – 10 theses about the crisis

You second post -it was like listening to myself!

Angelique
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 3418
Location : Freezing in England
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-08-28

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:40 pm

Angelique wrote:Panda and Badboy

Can you wait for me to catch up - what I mean is - I am here just have to start at the beginning.

ETA I knew it was Germany all along!

O.K., We'll wait for you to let us know when you are ready.

Angelique , this thread is averaging 300 hits a day, loads in the early hours of the morning, maybe from Europe, obviously the outcome of this will
affect us all.

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  malena stool on Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:25 pm

The continuing crisis is stark proof that the Euro was and still is a non starter. The only winners are politicians, bankers and political drones from across the European community who have taken up residence in Brussels.

malena stool
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Male
Number of posts : 13363
Location : Spare room above the kitchen
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2009-10-04

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Panda on Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:36 pm

malena stool wrote:The continuing crisis is stark proof that the Euro was and still is a non starter. The only winners are politicians, bankers and political drones from across the European community who have taken up residence in Brussels.

funny enough I started off talking to a young man from Npower about my electric Bill and we ended up taling about the Euro Crisis....as you do.

He has been studying Law , particularly wondering how the Treaty can survive now that Merkel and Sarkozy have used the ECB and brought in new
Fiscal policies all to save the Euro. He thinks the euro will crash , I said I thought Merkel was quite happy to let the Euro fall in value because it suited
Germany's Exports. Had the let Greece default 2 yrs ago they would never have got into so much debt and I hope they do default......the debt would
last for generations.

Panda
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 30555
Age : 59
Location : Wales
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-03-27

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  malena stool on Sat Feb 11, 2012 9:56 pm

It is terribly wrong that a country such as Germany, after being given vast amounts of aid to recovery and rebuilding from total devastation with US dollars and British pounds after 1945, while we here in the UK (as was much of Europe) enduring subsistence rationing, has been allowed to set itself up as the dominant partner in a completely predictable non workable amalgam of fiscal traditions and customs.

Merkel is laughing all the way to the Reichsbank.


malena stool
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Male
Number of posts : 13363
Location : Spare room above the kitchen
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2009-10-04

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Angelique on Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:25 pm

H Panda,

Many thanks for waiting for me. Lots of stuff I wish I hadn't missed.

I agree Germany has become too dominant - I too think that the Euro will crash simply because, even though no one admits it, we are in a Depression and all the policies being introduced don't promote growth. The man on the street is taking the hit, but they are the ones that should be protected. Huh, some European Union, I don't think.

Here are some snips from your previous posts:


“We are living in an economic dictatorship. And Greece is the
laboratory where they are testing the resistance of the people. After
us, it will be the turn of other countries in Europe. There will be no
more middle class.”

I have said that this is what I thought would happen. There is a powerful country in control

‘Santander , a Spanish Bank made a 98% loss which is very worrying, it may affect their Banks in Britain.’

They are advertising their bank accounts - if you put money in they will give money back!

Unemployment has hit record levels in the EU, putting
nearly a quarter of those Europeans who until now had a decent standard
of living at risk of sliding into social exclusion. The phenomenon is
undermining the EU’s strategies against poverty.
Well obviously, making the workers pay twice will have this effect. This is “the Depression I spoke about”

George Osborne, should have started with a growth plan and his bungling will mean the longest depression in 100 years.


Last edited by Angelique on Sun Feb 12, 2012 12:18 am; edited 1 time in total

Angelique
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Female
Number of posts : 3418
Location : Freezing in England
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2010-08-28

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Badboy on Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:56 pm

Angelique wrote:H Panda,

Many thanks for waiting for me. Lots of stuff I wish I hadn't missed.

I agree Germany has become become too dominant - I too think that the Euro will crash simply because, even though no one admits it, we are a Depression and all the policies being introduced don't promote growth. The man on the street is taking the hit, but they are the ones that should be protected. Huh, some European Union, I don't think.

Here are some snips from your previous posts:


“We are living in an economic dictatorship. And Greece is the
laboratory where they are testing the resistance of the people. After
us, it will be the turn of other countries in Europe. There will be no
more middle class.”

I have said that this is what I thought would happen. There is a powerful country in control

‘Santander , a Spanish Bank made a 98% loss which is very worrying, it may affect their Banks in Britain.’

They are advertising their bank accounts - if you put money in they will give money back!

Unemployment has hit record levels in the EU, putting
nearly a quarter of those Europeans who until now had a decent standard
of living at risk of sliding into social exclusion. The phenomenon is
undermining the EU’s strategies against poverty.
Well obviously, making the workers pay twice will have this effect. This is “the Depression I spoke about”

George Osborne, should have started with a growth plan and his bungling will mean the longest depression in 100 years.
SANTANDER,98% LOSS,WHERE'S THIS?

Badboy
Platinum Poster
Platinum Poster

Male
Number of posts : 7728
Age : 50
Warning :
0 / 1000 / 100

Registration date : 2009-08-31

Back to top Go down

Re: New EC Thread

Post  Sponsored content Today at 1:49 am


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 5 of 40 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 22 ... 40  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum