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Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

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Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

Post  Panda on Thu 22 Nov - 8:45






    1. Leveson Inquiry casting 'shadow' over Britain's free press

    The Leveson Inquiry is casting a "shadow" over Britain's free press and state regulation would set a "disastrous" precedent for the rest of the world, the head of the Foreign Press Association has warned.









    Inquiry: Lord Justice Leveson has indicated that he believes some form of statutory regulation of the press is needed Photo: PA



    By Steven Swinford

    10:00PM GMT 21 Nov 2012




    Dr Jurgen Kronig said that Britain's "long and noble tradition" of a free press was under threat and that state regulation could lead to greater censorship of the media in other countries.


    He said Britain enjoys the "freest, most probably the best press in the world" and that he hopes it remains "unshackled" in future.


    His intervention comes ahead of the publication of a report into the press by Lord Justice Leveson, expected at the end of this month, amid growing concerns that it will recommend statutory regulation.


    Dr Kronig said he was "worried" for the future of the British press. "Will you give up what served you so well in the past," he asked at the Foreign Press Association Media Awards. "I am talking about the long and noble tradition of a free press, free of political control and state regulation.


    "The shadow of the Leveson inquiry is still hanging over the media. Britain has in my view the freest, most probably the best press in the world."



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    He admitted that the behaviour of parts of the British press had been "disgraceful, embarrassing and at times illegal". He argued, however, that "the future will not be made safer by compliance officers."

    He said: "Another lesson of the last year is that there is no clear divide between good and bad media, between evil commercial empires and virtuous newspapers and high minded public broadcasting. You find bias and sinners on all sides.

    "It would send a dangerous signal to the world if this nation chose now to introduce such controls. It would send a disastrous message to countries around the world."

    He added that in many countries "pressure is growing" to "prevent journalists reporting the truth". He said that state intervention is not only an issue in authoritarian regimes, but also democratic ones.

    He concluded his speech by saying: "Let’s hope we gather here again next year to celebrate another year of excellent reporting, unshackled by new political controls."

    Britain's politicians are divided on the issue, with several senior Conservative ministers opposed to statutory regulation while Harriet Harman, deputy leader of the Labour Party, is in favour.

    Lord Black of Brentwood, chairman of the Press Standards Board of Finance, the co-ordinating body for newspaper and magazine publishers' trade associations, has urged caution.

    Lord Black, who is Executive Director of the Telegraph Media Group, publisher of The Daily Telegraph, has proposed a system of self-regulation under which newspapers could be fined up to £1m for "breakdowns in ethical behaviour".

    The proposal involves a complaints committee which would deal with grievances against the media, and a separate investigations and compliance panel with the power to call witnesses and demand documents as it looked into alleged breaches of ethical standards.

    Publishers would sign a five-year rolling contract with the regulator, paying annual fees, and would face legally enforceable penalties enshrined in the contract for any transgressions.

    Senior Conservative MPs have warned that state regulation of the press is "absolutely pointless" when people are able to use the internet to spread "lies and slurs".

    Angie Bray and Tracey Crouch, Conservative members of the Commons Culture, Media and Sport select committee, have warned it would be "illogical and unreasonable" to "tie the hands" of newspapers when people are free to say what they like on the internet.















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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Thu 22 Nov - 8:52

    I think the Press at times is too intrusive and has no regard for character assassinations. Because there are more Daily Papers than anywhere else in the world the Press resorts to sensational reporting to sell papers, especially now the Internet is depriving them of sales.

    There must be a happy medium and the Press should be better employed by investigating fraud, Goverment incompetance etc rather than who is sleeping with who or has odd sexual preferences.

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    Don't let newspaper victims set the rules

    Post  Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 8:52

    Don’t let newspaper victims set the rules, ex-minister warns


    Victims of press harassment should not be given the chance to rewrite the laws on press freedom, the former Cabinet minister Peter Lilley warns.








    Bob and Sally Dowler, parents of murdered school girl Milly Dowler and her sister Gemma (centre) Don’t let newspaper victims set the rules, ex-minister warns






    By Gordon Rayner, Chief Reporter

    8:53PM GMT 28 Nov 2012





    He said he had “infinite sympathy” for the likes of Bob and Sally Dowler, who found that the News of the World had hacked the phone of their murdered daughter Milly.


    But he said it was “wrong in principle” for them to have a say on the future of press regulation when the crimes committed against them are covered by existing laws.


    Lord Justice Leveson will publish his recommendations on the future of the press at 1.30pm today, when he will disclose whether he believes that 300 years of press freedom should come to an end.


    His findings – and David Cameron’s response – are expected to lead to divisions within the Coalition, as Conservatives are broadly opposed to state regulation, while the Lib Dems are in favour, though there are disagreements within each party.


    Mr Lilley, a former trade secretary, said he had been a victim of press harassment in the 1990s when newspapers investigated his private life in an attempt to expose hypocrisy over the Tories’ “back to basics” policy advocating family values.



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    He told the BBC: “Should those journalists have been called off? No they shouldn’t, I don’t think.

    “We’ve got to accept that that’s part of the price of having a free press. I’ve been a victim of press harassment and nastiness, I don’t like it. But I prefer to have a free press than a state-regulated press.”

    He added: “I have infinite sympathy for the Dowlers, for others, if you’ve lost a loved one, it’s terrible, you can imagine almost nothing worse.

    “One thing that made it worse for them is the harassment they received. But I think it’s wrong in principle to say that victims of wrongdoing should have the right to rewrite our laws to deal with offences far beyond anything they suffered, especially when the offences they suffered were covered by law and don’t need any independent regulator.

    “So I think this idea of creating victims, giving them the right to draw up statutes is wrong in principle and we shouldn’t go down that route.”

    His views were echoed by Tom Mockridge, the chief executive of News International, which closed the News of the World over the phone-hacking scandal which prompted the Leveson Inquiry.

    He said it was time for “fundamental” reform of media regulation involving a “tough” new press watchdog. But any form of state intervention would “cross a Rubicon”.

    He told the BBC that the public needed “a watchdog with bite and a watchdog with investigative powers,” staffed with a majority of people from outside the media industry.

    He added: “What they don’t need is the state sending people into newspapers to determine what’s a good story or what’s a bad story.”

    He said the public’s trust in newspapers was shown by the number of people who buy them.

    Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London, said during a visit to India: “The British media is one of the glories of our country. They keep politicians’ feet very firmly held to the fire, which is absolutely right.”

    The Tory MP Philip Davies, who sits on the Commons culture, media and sport committee, told Mr Cameron during Prime Minister’s Questions: “Can I warn you not to be remembered as the Prime Minister who introduced state regulation of the press.”

    Mr Cameron agreed that a free press is “absolutely vital to democracy”.

























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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 10:34

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/nov/29/leveson-report-published-and-brooks-and-coulson-in-court-live-coverage?CMP=twt_gu

    This is a twitter report .....too long to copy and paste


    Last edited by Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 12:00; edited 1 time in total

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 11:59

    Leveson To Publish Report Into Press Ethics


    David Cameron and Nick Clegg will respond separately to the report, which is expected to call for a regulator underpinned by law.


    10:40am UK, Thursday 29 November 2012












    Lord Justice Leveson's long-awaited report into press standards will be published later amid fears its recommendations could throw the Government into turmoil.

    David Cameron will respond to the recommendations in the Commons this afternoon, but in an extraordinary move his deputy Nick Clegg is preparing to make his own statement.

    Sky sources say this is not indicative of a major coalition split and aides stress there are areas of agreement, but it will fuel concern about deep divisions within the Government.

    Lord Justice Leveson's 2,000-page document will be unveiled at 1.30pm, with the judge widely expected to suggest a new regulator for newspapers underpinned by law.
    Bob and Sally Dowler arriving to hear the findings
    His inquiry was set up by the Prime Minister last July after it emerged the News Of The World hired a private detective to hack murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler's phone.

    Set to cost around £6m overall, it heard months of evidence from celebrities, media figures, politicians and the police.

    Mr Cameron has pledged to seek cross-party consensus on a new regulatory system but faces an uphill struggle to overcome deep divisions in the coalition and among his own MPs.

    :: READ MORE - Click here for our Leveson live blog

    Mr Clegg is reportedly ready to back the creation of a statutory regulator, a move that would be opposed by many Tories, and Mr Cameron is thought to be resisting.
    Kate McCann outside the QEII centre
    The pair have been poring over the report trying to agree a joint approach since half-a-dozen advance copies were delivered to Downing Street.

    Asked about press regulation in the Commons on Wednesday, Mr Cameron said: "This Government set up Leveson because of unacceptable practices in parts of the media and because of a failed regulatory system.

    "I think we should try and work across party lines on this issue, it is right to meet with other party leaders about this issue and I will do so.

    "What matters most I believe is that we end up with an independent regulatory system that can deliver and in which the public have confidence."

    Labour leader Ed Miliband welcomed Mr Cameron's commitment and insisted he wanted "real change".

    "I hope we can work on an all-party basis. This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity for real change and I hope that this House can make it happen," he told MPs.

    All three main party leaders have indicated they will support the report's recommendations as long as they are "proportionate".

    But there is speculation Mr Cameron could offer Parliament a free vote rather than try to force through measures and suffer a damaging rebellion.

    Dozens of Tory MPs signed an open letter warning against statutory regulation this week - shortly after 42 of their colleagues called for tougher laws to curb newspapers' excesses.
    Protesters dressed as David Cameron and Rupert Murdoch
    The latest group included "big beasts" Liam Fox and David Davis, media select committee chairman John Whittingdale and 1922 committee chairman Graham Brady.

    Campaign group Hacked Off, which represents victims of press intrusion, has welcomed the Government's commitment to seek cross-party agreement and urged leaders to avoid unnecessary delay.

    The Spectator, the country's oldest political magazine, has insisted it would refuse to join any regulatory system enforced by the Government.

    News International's chief executive Tom Mockridge has backed calls for a "tough" new press watchdog but warned that state-backed regulation would put too much power in politicians' hands.

    A new opinion poll has found the majority of voters favour statutory regulation, with 51% for, 20% against and 29% unsure.

    The ComRes survey for ITV News At Ten, which interviewed 2,038 adults online from November 23-25, found 48% believed the current system was not tough enough, while 28% thought it about right.


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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 12:03

    See Kate gets her picture in the Papers AGAIN......still no Gerry.

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 13:47

    Keep across the latest developments as Lord Justice Leveson publishes his report about the British press.


    1:44pm UK, Thursday 29 November 2012


    Play
    LiveLondon

    Live Stream: Leveson Report Is Unveiled
    Enlarge









    1. 1:43pm
      Leveson does NOT suggest that the government should be involved any form of regulatory measure

    2. 1:42pm
      Lord Justice Leveson continues to deliver his findings. "There must be change," he says.

    3. 1:42pm
      LJ Leveson: "I have been working to expose precisely what has been happening and recommend changes. There must be change."

    4. 1:42pm
      Lord Justice Leveson delivers the findings of his inquiry


    5. 1:42pm
      Leveson: "the British press - I repeat, ALL OF IT - serves the country well for the vast majority of the time." http://www.mediareform.org.uk/featured/live-blog-the-leveson-report

    6. 1:41pm
      Leveson is at pains to emphasise he does appreciate the good work journalists do.

    7. 1:40pm
      LJ Leveson: "A free press in a democracy hold power to account...but the UK press has not performed that vital role"

    8. 1:40pm
      A couple of minutes into #Leveson's speech, the word "unfortunately" appears. Here we go, we suppose... http://www.mediareform.org.uk/featured/live-blog-the-leveson-report

    9. 1:39pm
      "... and as the standard-bearer for people who have no one else to stand up for them."

    10. 1:39pm
      Leveson: "I know how vital the press is as a guardian of the interests of the public, as a critical witness of events..."

    11. 1:38pm
      And he's up... Lord Justice Leveson makes a statement after publication of his report p.twimg.com/A831lkJCEAAKv_P.jpg

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Lillyofthevalley on Thu 29 Nov - 21:02

    Panda wrote:See Kate gets her picture in the Papers AGAIN......still no Gerry.


    Yes every picture tells a story Panda, god Kate looks awful that long hair and daft fringe does nothing but age her, and NO Gez, I'm sure they have split up he is never to be seen its always Kate ....

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  malena stool on Thu 29 Nov - 21:16

    Lillyofthevalley wrote:
    Panda wrote:See Kate gets her picture in the Papers AGAIN......still no Gerry.


    Yes every picture tells a story Panda, god Kate looks awful that long hair and daft fringe does nothing but age her, and NO Gez, I'm sure they have split up he is never to be seen its always Kate ....
    He perhaps considers her too much of an embarrassment and a loose cannon.....

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 22:23

    I can't see them splitting before the Amaral trial, if they back out now Amaral could countersue and of course claim for all the Books Duarte didn't return. Nor before the Review is finished, but I think they know nothing was found and the PJ were not negligent , so they are going to look very foolish and manipulative persuading Cameron to agree a review.

    Kate definitely looks out of sorts , like I said when she attended the Cameron meeting. They are both going to lose any credibility they had and it would obviously affect the sale of Kate's next book.

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 22:57

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    Last edited by Panda on Fri 30 Nov - 6:59; edited 1 time in total

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 23:09

    Kate McCann: PM Should Act Swiftly On Leveson


    Victims of intrusion welcome the Leveson report but say they are disappointed by the Prime Minister's failure to fully back it.


    10:20pm UK, Thursday 29 November 2012

    Kate McCann hopes the Leveson report is the start of a "new era"



    Victims of press intrusion have demanded the independent, self-regulatory body underpinned by legislation proposed by Lord Justice Leveson has "real teeth".

    Video: Hacking Victims Back Leveson Report
    Enlarge




    var Madeleine McCann's mother Kate says she hopes the Leveson report will mark the start of a new era for the press and has urged David Cameron to "embrace the report and act swiftly".

    Mrs McCann gave moving evidence to the Leveson Inquiry about the intense media interest after her daughter went missing during a family holiday in Portugal in 2007 and was at the Queen Elizabeth II conference centre for the report's publication.

    She said: "I welcome Lord Leveson's report and hope it will mark the start of a new era for our press in which it treats those in the news responsibly, with care and consideration.

    "I hope the Prime Minister and all the party leaders will embrace the report and act swiftly to ensure activation of Lord Leveson's recommendations within an acceptable and clearly defined timescale."

    The Prime Minister told the Commons he has "serious concerns and misgivings" about bringing in laws to back a new system of press regulation.

    His statement has angered victims of press intrusion, who have demanded the independent, self-regulatory body underpinned by legislation proposed by Lord Justice Leveson has "real teeth".

    But senior figures from News International and the Telegraph Media Group have said newspapers will resist any legislation backing up a new regulator.
    Hugh Grant said victims felt "betrayal" when the PM made his statement
    Actor Hugh Grant said intrusion victims felt "betrayal" when they heard David Cameron's response to Lord Justice Leveson's report.

    The Love Actually star, who has backed the Hacked Off campaign group, tweeted: "With a group of (non celeb) victims including Hillsborough families listening to PM. Buzzword is betrayal."

    Former Crimewatch presenter and hacking victim Jacqui Hames told a press conference she found Mr Cameron's statement "rather depressing".

    She said the PM's support of the majority of the report was "good" but added: "It starts to fall apart without the underpinning regulation."

    Earlier she said Lord Leveson had "rightly condemned this outrageous conduct of the press in recent years" and called for a deadline for newspapers to join the proposed new self-regulatory body.

    Hacking victim Graham Foulkes, whose son David was killed in the 7/7 London bombings, welcomed the report but said he would not support legislation.

    He also criticised the "hijack" of the Leveson inquiry by celebrities with an "agenda".
    Max Mosley said it would be "astonishing" if the report was not implemented
    He told Sky News: "My concern is the notion that parliament are going to become involved in regulating or licensing or have got a toe in the door of having control over the media.

    He added: "For the first time that I can remember an inquiry was set up for ordinary people and it set off with the right motivations... but very quickly the Hugh Grant roadshow came to town, the celebrity circus, and it became OK magazine overnight."

    "I didn't feel it ever quite got back on track, but I've been proved wrong today because Sir Brian (Lord Leveson) has pulled it out of the bag."

    The man wrongly arrested for the murder of Joanna Yeates has said it would be a "disaster" if Mr Cameron failed to implement the Leveson proposals in full.

    Her landlord, retired teacher Christopher Jefferies, 67, told ITV News he would feel "let down" if the Prime Minister decided to side-step recommendations on legislation.

    "I would certainly feel let down," he said. "I would think it would be a disaster."

    Former Formula One boss Max Mosley said it would be "astonishing" if the Government did not implement Lord Leveson's recommendations.

    Mr Mosley won £60,000 in damages from News Of The World in 2008 over an article alleging that he took part in a "sick Nazi orgy", which he denied.

    He told Sky News: "It certainly is a very thorough document and it's in many respects better than one could have hoped.
    PCC chair Lord Hunt said he was "not convinced" about statutory regulation
    "The only real omission is that if you want to stop something coming out because you find that they are going to breach your privacy, you would still have to go to court to do that, which of course is very expensive.

    "I think it would be astonishing if the politicians didn't implement the report because no responsible politician could allow the current situation to continue," he added.

    Many in the media were supportive of Mr Cameron's reluctance to rush down the statutory regulation route.

    Carl Bernstein, one of the investigative journalists who broke the Watergate scandal in the US, said the British press was right to resist legislation.

    He told Channel 4 News there were already enough laws in the UK to put journalists who hacked phones in jail.

    "The answer is find the proper way to put them in jail for the horrible offences that they are guilty of, not to try and restrain free speech, freedom of the press - that is going to come back and bite British democracy in the ass because that is what this is about."

    News International chief executive officer Tom Mockridge said the former publisher of the News Of The World backed Mr Cameron's "rejection" of new legislation.
    Joanna Yeates' landlord Chris Jefferies urged the PM to legislate
    He said: "As a company we are keen to play our full part, with others in our industry, in creating a new body that commands the confidence of the public.

    "We believe that this can be achieved without statutory regulation - and welcome the Prime Minister's rejection of that proposal.

    "We accept that a new system should be independent, have a standards code, a means of resolving disputes, the power to demand prominent apologies and the ability to levy heavy fines.

    "We have spent 18 months reflecting upon these issues and are determined to move on as soon as possible with others in our sector to set up a new body that will ensure British journalism is both responsible and robust."

    Lord Black of Brentwood, the chairman of the Press Standards Board of Finance and executive director of the Telegraph Media Group warned that aspects of the proposals are "profoundly dangerous" and would put a state regulator "at the very heart of the newsroom".

    Lord Hunt, head of the widely discredited Press Complaints Commission (PCC), said: "I suggest that we all now digest this report and seek our common ground and then unite around it.

    "Above all it is absolutely key that the result is a new regulator with effective sanctions and teeth, and independent from the industry and from the Government.

    "I have to say, however, that I am not convinced statutory regulation including supervision of press regulation by Ofcom would have prevented the horrors of the past."

    Bob Satchwell, executive director of the Society of Editors, warned that detailed statutory underpinning of regulation could be dangerous.

    He told Sky News: "What you can't have is too much detail in any kind of statutory underpinning, that's where the danger lies.

    "Most politicians, once you give them a little nose into something, will try to find a very much wider thing down the line.

    "We might have benign politicians now, but 10 years' time? That's the problem."

    Following criticism of relationships between police and journalists during the Leveson Inquiry, Andy Trotter from the Association of Chief Police Officers said forces would "build upon" measures already taken to tighten up guidance.

    He said: "Police should have a professional, open and transparent relationship with the public and the media. The media can provide a vital role in communicating with the public, helping society to solve crime, and holding public institutions to account."

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Thu 29 Nov - 23:28

    Well obviously Kate does not realise that her friendship with Rebekah Brooks who helped her get a review in return for the Sun having sole rights to serialisation of her Book for a fee of £200,000 will be suspect. Kate and Gerry used the press shamelessly when it suited them, even now the Press will print Libellous articles. Maybe Gerry is deliberately keeping a low profile because he understands the implication more than Kate if SY find nothing that wasn't investigated


    Last edited by Panda on Fri 30 Nov - 7:06; edited 3 times in total

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Fri 30 Nov - 6:57

    Gordon Rayner and Robert Winnett

    10:14PM GMT 29 Nov 2012




    The Prime Minister divided the Coalition by announcing that he was opposed to the state intervening in a free press and urged the House of Commons, a “bulwark of democracy”, to think “very, very carefully” about such a move.


    His threat came less than two hours after Lord Justice Leveson announced that a new independent press regulator, backed by legislation, was necessary in the wake of media scandals.


    Lord Leveson, who has spent more than a year investigating media ethics, criticised decades of “outrageous” behaviour by newspapers which had “wreaked havoc with the lives of innocent people”.


    The findings of the official inquiry were backed by Nick Clegg and Ed Miliband who are now expected to join forces in an attempt to push through new press laws. The issue could present the biggest crisis yet faced by the Coalition.


    All three party leaders said that the current system of media regulation was not “fit for purpose”.



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    However, the Prime Minister stated that newspapers could be forced to pay substantial fines and offer swift redress to victims of wrongdoing without the need for statute.

    He said that it was up to the media industry to bring forward tough proposals to prevent abuses.

    In a statement to the Commons, Mr Cameron expressed doubt over the central recommendation of the Leveson Inquiry.

    “I have some serious concerns and misgivings about this recommendation,” he said. “For the first time we would have crossed the Rubicon, writing elements of press regulation into the law of the land.

    “We should, I believe, be wary of any legislation which has the potential to infringe free speech and a free press.

    In this House, which has been a bulwark of democracy for centuries, we should think very, very carefully before crossing this line.”

    He added: “The danger is that this would create a vehicle for politicians, whether today or some time in the future, to impose regulation and obligations on the press, something Lord Justice Leveson himself wishes to avoid.”

    Mr Cameron also said that he was sceptical about Data Protection laws being tightened to allow the prosecution of more journalists.

    Maria Miller, the Culture Secretary, said last night that the Government had “grave concerns” about how to implement the Leveson recommendations.

    However, in a move unprecedented in recent times, Mr Clegg also made a statement in Parliament expressing his opposition to Mr Cameron’s view.

    The Deputy Prime Minister said that “we need to get on with this without delay” to ensure that press laws protected victims.

    He added: “He [Lord Leveson] has found that changing the law is the only way to guarantee a system of self-regulation which seeks to cover all of the press.

    “Changing the law is the only way to give us all the assurance that the new regulator isn’t just independent for a few months or years, but is independent for good.”

    Cross-party talks attended by the three party leaders began on Thursday night in an attempt to resolve the issue.

    However, well-placed sources said the prospect of a deal was “not good”.

    The Prime Minister is expected to attempt to thwart any attempts by the Liberal Democrats and Labour to introduce legislation against his will.

    Officials have started drafting legal clauses which Conservative sources hope will demonstrate how a press law would be unworkable.

    Senior Labour sources said they were also confident about forcing any necessary laws through Parliament with the support of Mr Clegg.

    There may be a non-binding vote in the Commons as soon as next month, with dozens of Conservatives already publicly backing new laws to rein in the press.

    The political stand-off came after Lord Leveson published a report running to almost 2,000 pages — the result of a lengthy inquiry which has seen dozens of witnesses questioned under oath.

    Lord Leveson said: “There have been too many times when, chasing the story, parts of the press have acted as if its own code, which it wrote, simply did not exist.

    “This has caused real hardship, and on occasion, wreaked havoc with the lives of innocent people whose rights and liberties have been disdained.

    “This is not just the famous but ordinary members of the public, caught up in events, many of them truly tragic, far larger than they could cope with, but made much, much worse by press behaviour that, at times, can only be described as outrageous.”

    The report’s main recommendations and findings included:

    An independent regulator with the power to fine newspapers up to £1million or 1 per cent of turnover for breaching a code of conduct.

    The new regulator is to be underpinned by statute to “protect the freedom of the press, to reassure the public and validate the new body”.

    Ofcom to carry out reviews every two years of how the new regulator is working and to act as backstop watchdog if publishers refuse to sign up to the new body.

    The Information Commissioner to be given greater powers to prosecute newspapers for breaches of data protection.

    Senior politicians, including Mr Cameron, are accused of undermining confidence in politicians by becoming too close to newspaper executives.

    New Labour is criticised for introducing a culture of “spin” in government.

    Jeremy Hunt, the former culture secretary, is cleared of any bias over his role in the proposed BSkyB takeover, but criticised for failing to supervise his special adviser during contact with News Corporation.

    No widespread evidence of corruption in police, but the handling of the phone hacking scandal is criticised.

    A warning that further arrests of journalists are likely as criminal inquiries may spread beyond Murdoch-owned newspapers.

    It is understood that the press will be given a deadline of mid-January by ministers to produce proposals for regulating newspapers.

    Senior government sources warned newspaper groups that they need to come to an industry-wide agreement “within six weeks”.

    Lord Hunt, the chairman of the Press Complaints Commission, said that he would move to establish a new regulatory system by next June.



























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    Why the Hell did Cameron call for the review if he doesn't intend to abide by it???
    He really is a weak PM , ovbviously been got at by you know who.

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Fri 30 Nov - 18:03

    Leveson's regulator ignores 'appalling abuse' on internet, MPs warn


    Lord Justice Leveson has designed a regulator for the press of "20 years ago" and ignored the impact of the internet, senior MPs have warned.








    Prince Harry in Las Vegas Photo: BAUER-GRIFFIN/EROTEME.CO.UK





    By Steven Swinford

    11:45AM GMT 30 Nov 2012

    197 Comments




    The Leveson report dismissed the internet as an "ethical vacuum" and said that it was up to the press to rise above it and follow higher standards.


    He devotes just 12 pages of the 1,987 page report to discussing the role of the internet, and concludes that online news outlets can subscribe to regulation if they wish.


    John Whittingdale, the Conservative chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee, said his approach was "curious".


    He said: "It is curious to bring in very strong controls to prevent newspapers breaking the code when it's so easy for online providers to do so.


    "At a time when more and more people are going online to obtain news and as a result circulation of newspapers is in steady decline, it seems strange to respond by designing a system which does very little to address new media. It's a system that is designed for the media of 20 years ago rather than today."



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      29 Nov 2012


    Lord Justice Leveson said that while people will not assume that what they read on the internet is “trustworthy”, they expect newspapers to be a “quality product”.

    He said: “Some have called it a 'wild west’ but I would prefer to use the term 'ethical vacuum’. The internet does not claim to operate by express ethical standards, so that bloggers and others may, if they choose, act with impunity.

    “The press, on the other hand, does claim to operate by and adhere to an ethical code of conduct. Newspapers, through whichever medium they are delivered, purport to offer a quality product in all senses of the term.

    “In contrast, the internet does not function on that basis at all. People will not assume that what they read on the internet is trustworthy or that it carries any particular assurance or accuracy; it need be no more than one person’s view.

    Mr Whittingdale, however, said many people believe what they read on the internet. He said: "People take the interent more seriously than he [Leveson] gives it credit for. They think that if something looks professions online then it should be reliable. People have to learn how to filter out and recognise material which is properly sourced and reliable."

    Lord Justice Leveson also addressed the publication of naked pictures of Prince Harry and the Duchess of Cambridge on the internet.

    In August, Prince Harry was photographed playing strip billiards with a girl in a £5,100 eight-room suite at the Encore Wynn resort in Las Vegas. The images were widely circulated on the internet and several days later published by The Sun newspaper.

    The Sun published an article which stated: “It is absurd in the internet age newspapers like The Sun could be stopped from publishing stories and pictures already seen by millions on the free-for-all that is the web.”

    Lord Justice Leveson said that the debate about whether Prince Harry’s behaviour was in the public interest did not justify publishing the pictures. He said: “What transpired and what the photographs revealed was graphically described in print. The debate did not need the pictures.”

    He said that The Sun ignored the “large number of people who do not want to see the photographs”, adding: “The fact that something is on the internet does not justify its publication in a newspaper.”

    He compared The Sun’s decision to publish the Prince Harry pictures with the decision by British newspapers to condemn the publication of topless pictures of the Duchess of Cambridge in a French magazine.

    Lord Justice Leveson said: “There has to be some other public interest in publication of that image in order to justify it. For the Duchess, there clearly is not.

    “But that equally means that playing the card of widespread availability is not good enough in relation to the Prince Harry photos either.

    “If society wants them [the Royal Family] to mix with the public and in the real world, they have to be given the space to do so and their right to have a degree of privacy… must also be recognised.”

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Fri 30 Nov - 18:36

    ]


    I would like to comment on the Leveson Report and wonder why Cameron is loath to accept it when he was the one who commisioned it.

    It is a fact that the Tabloid Press often print unsubstantiated articles and only three days ago here was a prime example printed by a few concerning Madeleine McCann.

    It was reported that the latest suspect is Hewlett , all the gory details etc which are completely untrue. Hewlett was interviewed by the Portugese Police and proved he was 70 miles away when Madeleine went missing . His Son supposedly was given a letter from him naming the suspect , but burned it!!! Hewlett is dead and cannot defend himself .




    This is the kind of reporting that needs to be addressed and I do wonder why this story was printed NOW, while Kate McCann is in the limelight once again. Her phone was not hacked, she was paid handsomely for the Libel in the Daily Express, and would have known Hewlett was not a suspect , yet let the report be published.

    I despair of Politicians and the Tabloid Press.




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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Fri 30 Nov - 20:14

    Forgot to mention this was sent to the BBC Breakfast Programme, the Presenters were asking for public opinion on the Leveson enquiry.

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Sat 1 Dec - 7:18

    Leveson Report: victims of press intrusion too 'angry' to attend meeting with Culture Secretary


    Victims of press intrusion refused to attend a planned meeting with Maria Miller to discuss the Leveson Report because of anger over David Cameron's stance. JK Rowling says she feels "duped".








    JK Rowling feels "duped" by the Prime Minister Photo: PA






    By Gordon Rayner, Chief Reporter

    7:25PM GMT 30 Nov 2012





    Victims of press intrusion refused to attend a planned meeting with the Culture Secretary to discuss the Leveson Report today because they were so “angry” at David Cameron’s dismissal of its key recommendation.


    Gerry and Kate McCann, Bob and Sally Dowler and Christopher Jefferies were among those invited to attend the meeting with Maria Miller, but they felt so “let down” by Mr Cameron that they stayed away.


    JK Rowling, the Harry Potter author, said she felt “duped” and “dismayed” when Mr Cameron announced he did not intend to impose statutory underpinning of a new press regulator.


    Instead of meeting victims, Mrs Miller met journalism professor Brian Cathcart, one of the founders of the Hacked Off campaign, and the former LibDem MP Evan Harris, associate director of Hacked Off, to discuss the Government’s response to the Leveson Report.


    Dr Harris said: “The victims that we asked along felt too let down to meet her and too angry, so we went on our own.



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    “We wanted to know the basis for David Cameron’s principled objection to legal backing of an independent regulator when he had never mentioned this objection to us in previous meetings.

    “We left the meeting none the wiser.”

    Mr Jefferies, who successfully sued several newspapers for libel because of stories written about him during the Joanna Yeates murder inquiry, met Labour’s Harriet Harman and the LibDems’ Jo Swinson to thank them for their party leaders’ support for statutory underpinning of regulation.

    In a statement, JK Rowling said: “I am alarmed and dismayed that the Prime Minister appears to be backing away from assurances he made at the outset of the Leveson Inquiry.

    “Without statutory underpinning Leveson’s recommendations will not work. We will be left with yet another voluntary system from which the press can walk away.

    “If the Prime Minister did not wish to change the regulatory system even to the moderate, balanced and proportionate extent proposed by Lord Leveson, I am at a loss to understand why so much public money has been spent and why so many people have been asked to re-live extremely painful episodes on the stand in front of millions.

    “Having taken David Cameron’s assurances in good faith at the outset of the inquiry he set up, I am merely one among many who feel duped and angry in its wake.”

    Mr McCann said the process of giving evidence to the Leveson Inquiry would have been “almost useless” if the report’s recommendations are not implemented in full.

    Mr McCann, whose daughter Madeleine went missing during a holiday in Portugal five years ago, said: "Our politicians have now got the ability to do the right thing, and the right thing is to implement in full.

    "I think the only reason we went to Leveson was to affect change and if Leveson's report isn't implemented in full then I would say that giving evidence for all of the victims has been almost useless.

    "If we don't have it on a statute then the process will fall apart."

    Paul Dadge, one of the heroes of the 7/7 terror attacks, who was a victim of phone hacking, said of Mr Cameron’s stance: "There's an opportunity here for this to backfire on him spectacularly.

    "He has either got to side with the public or with the press. There's no halfway house.

    "The press have had their opportunity for the last 70 years. It's now time for the public and for victims to have their voices heard."

    The Hacked Off campaign launched an online petition yesterday calling on David Cameron, Nick Clegg and Ed Miliband to implement the recommendations of the Leveson Report in full.

    So far more than 25,000 people have signed it.

    ========================

    JKR was interviewed and she said she was horrified that her 5 yr old Daughter could get to know about the phone hacking etc.. JK is a substantial donor to the Labour Party.

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Sat 1 Dec - 14:27

    Leveson: 50,000 Sign Hacked Off Petition


    Support for a law to regulate newspapers gathers pace in the wake of the Leveson Inquiry, ahead of talks about a new watchdog.


    1:50pm UK, Saturday 01 December 2012



    Video: Hacked Off: New Press Law 'Essential'
    Enlarge








    • An online petition demanding the Government act on Lord Justice Leveson's recommendations in full has attracted 50,000 supporters in less than 24 hours.

      Support for the petition launched by Hacked Off, the group campaigning for victims of phone hacking, has doubled overnight.

      It comes as the Culture Secretary warned newspaper editors not to drag their feet in acting on Lord Justice Leveson's calls for setting up a new press watchdog.

      Maria Miller will meet the newspaper industry's most powerful editors next week to push for urgent action.

      Lord Hunt of Wirral, the chairman of the Press Complaints Commission, who will also attend, told The Times he wanted a speedy industry resolution to help persuade the public and MPs that laws were not needed to underpin the new independent regulator.
      Paul Dacre has acknowledged that swift action is needed
      "There's an awful lot we can agree on and I have suggested to the industry (that we) all read the report, digest it and seek out the common ground and unite with one voice," he said.

      Ms Miller's warning will come the day before editors on the Code of Practice Committee, chaired by Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre, meet to decide how to tackle the Leveson recommendations.

      Mr Dacre said: "Lord Justice Leveson has set us a number of challenges: our task is to address them as urgently as possible."

      It comes as reports emerged that Foreign Secretary William Hague warned Cabinet colleagues earlier this week that a "Leveson law" would undermine the UK's ability to address freedom of speech issues globally, particularly on cases such as the jailing of punk band Pussy Riot in Russia.

      A Government source told The Daily Telegraph: "It was a very serious presentation. He warned that Britain demonstrating that we have a free press is part of our ability to say we believe in democracy."
      Best-selling novelist JK Rowling at the inquiry last November
      But David Cameron is under intense pressure to drop his opposition to a law backing up the new watchdog the press has been tasked with devising.

      The Prime Minister is facing a backlash from victims of media intrusion over his resistance to legislation.

      Author JK Rowling has said that she felt "duped and angry" by Mr Cameron's hesitance to "cross the Rubicon" and introduce a press law.

      The Harry Potter author, who gave evidence about press intrusion into her family's privacy to the inquiry, said: "If the Prime Minister did not wish to change the regulatory system even to the moderate, balanced and proportionate extent proposed by Lord Leveson, I am at a loss to understand why so much public money has been spent and why so many people have been asked to relive extremely painful episodes on the stand in front of millions."

      The most high-profile victims of phone hacking refused to meet the Culture Secretary on Friday, saying they felt let down by Mr Cameron's response.

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Sun 2 Dec - 8:36

    Chakrabarti: 'Leveson Law Would Be Unlawful'


    Liberty director Shami Chakrabarti says regulation of the press must be voluntary and any mandatory action would be unlawful.


    6:31am UK, Sunday 02 December 2012

    Chakrabarti says she can't support the report






    • A key aide to Lord Justice Leveson claims his calls for press reform laws would be illegal and may breach the Human Rights Act.

      Shami Chakrabarti, one of six assessors who worked with the judge on the inquiry, told the Mail On Sunday she could not support legislation because it would "coerce" newspapers into holding higher standards than anyone else, which would be unlawful.

      Ms Chakrabarti,the director of civil rights group Liberty, warned that Lord Justice Leveson’s proposal for an independent regulatory body backed up in law could have "serious unintended consequences".
      The report on press reforms was issued last week
      She said: "In a democracy, regulation of the press and imposing standards on it must be voluntary.

      "A compulsory statute to regulate media ethics in the way the report suggests would violate the Act, and I cannot support it."

      She said Labour leader Ed Miliband had been "hasty" in supporting the recommendations unveiled earlier this week.

      Of Hacked Off, she told the Mail On Sunday: "I understand that people who have been wronged want action. But they should be interested in outcomes, rather than particular processes.
      The PM has serious concerns about legislative action
      "The outcome they should be seeking is a free and vibrant press with access to justice for the public when things go wrong."

      David Cameron said he had "serious concerns and misgivings" about legislative action, but faces intense pressure to implement the findings from victims of press intrusion, the public and other party leaders.

      The Prime Minister, who called for the press to be given some time to get its own house in order, will warn Fleet Street it must take swift action to set up an independent press watchdog in crunch talks with the industry next week.

      The report has ratcheted up coalition tensions, with the Liberal Democrats saying they are prepared to back the regulatory system and slapping down Tory claims that draft laws were only being drawn up to demonstrate the proposals were unworkable.
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    • Leveson: McCann Urges PM To Remember Victims
    • Leveson: Hopes Of Unity Are Shattered

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Sun 2 Dec - 8:46

    Shami Chakrabarti, one of six assessors who worked with the judge on the inquiry, told the Mail On Sunday she could not support legislation because it would "coerce" newspapers into holding higher standards than anyone else, which would be unlawful"

    What a load of codswallop , why shouldn't the Press have higher standards???? There are too many tabloids for the size of Britain which is why there are so many reports of the same story. The Press do not bother to research , just go with the flow , I would dearly love Hewlett's partner and mother of his children to sue all those Papers who printed that story.

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  malena stool on Sun 2 Dec - 9:22

    This is one point in which I agree with Cameron, much as it goes against the grain...

    The present state of affairs here in the UK exposed by Leveson's report has identified that many of our 'ruling class' from local councillors right through the police and judicial system to parliamentary representatives of both houses, has formed a buddy network with big business and the media. It is this cosy 'network' and accepted code of practice which needs changing and safeguarding.

    There are enough good, well thought out and potent laws in this country which can be, but are never used. Doubtlessly because they would inhibit the illegal practices that pass for normal business in today's Britain.

    Why not use these existing laws to their utmost instead of the alternative....taking years of pathetic 'quango' investigations which cost £millions putting yet more money into the pockets of the puerile, ignorant and titled drones who are usually elected to serve on such committees and would be as unusable as existing laws unless fully and properly enforced?


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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  malena stool on Sun 2 Dec - 9:25

    My thoughts on Shami Chakrabarti and other similar 'free thinking, do-gooding, human rights' type creatures would probably get me barred....

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  Panda on Sun 2 Dec - 9:47

    I agree, too much is made of Human Rights which has gone too far IMO.

    I'm half watching the Andrew Marr show and when they were doing Press reviews, there was an article in the Centre Pages of the Observer being discussed. Would you believe it......there was a photo of Gerry and Kate hand in hand.!!!!!

    I don't know if it was the same day that Kate had the meeting with Cameron, but in this photo she is wearing a double breasted black coat with a scarf tucked inside and Gerry had a suit on. If someone can find the photo of her meeting with Cameron and post it here I would be grateful.

    Hugh Grant was a Guest and speaking by video to Hugh Whittingdale ( don't know who he is) and Hugh was very good and commented on the friendships between Politicians and the Media.

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

    Post  malena stool on Sun 2 Dec - 9:55

    Panda wrote:I agree, too much is made of Human Rights which has gone too far IMO.

    I'm half watching the Andrew Marr show and when they were doing Press reviews, there was an article in the Centre Pages of the Observer being discussed. Would you believe it......there was a photo of Gerry and Kate hand in hand.!!!!!

    I don't know if it was the same day that Kate had the meeting with Cameron, but in this photo she is wearing a double breasted black coat with a scarf tucked inside and Gerry had a suit on. If someone can find the photo of her meeting with Cameron and post it here I would be grateful.

    Hugh Grant was a Guest and speaking by video to Hugh Whittingdale ( don't know who he is) and Hugh was very good and commented on the friendships between Politicians and the Media.
    Panda, do you mean Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall of River Cottage fame?

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    Re: Leveson Inquiry casting "shadow" over Britain's free press.

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